Faces of Red Wing | Christina Giordani

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Christina Giordani
Christina Giordani

 

Where were you born and raised?

I was born in Southern California in a suburb north of Los Angeles where I was very connected to the natural world through surfing, hiking and exploring but had little connection to my food. When I moved to San Francisco at the age of eighteen my world opened up and agriculture and the connection to food producers found its way into my heart.

If someone asked you about your profession how would you respond?

My profession is a mix of creating a path for myself and walking through the doors that opened for me. I have developed a profession that is hard to define, it’s a mix of expertise and constant education. I am an Agrarian Innovator who helps farmers, ranchers and producers tell their story and develop their businesses, yet at the same time I learn from all these skilled and brilliant people I come in contact with.

Agrarian_Giordani

What does a normal day look like for you?

No day is ever the same. One morning I may be at a ranch assisting with sheering sheep or at a farm harvesting potatoes and in the afternoon doing a tasting with a chef. The next day I may be at the butchers in the morning and producing a video shoot focused on sharing the story and passion of a 4th generation farmer in the afternoon. I juggle multiple projects and clients at a time so it isn’t a rare thing to see me in a field on my cell phone responding to emails and making calls with whatever service I can find.

What is the most rewarding aspect of what you do?

The people. It takes a very special person to raise, grow or produce food for others.

What lead you to farm and ranch work?

A bunch of little things led me here, but the most significant of those was my friendships in college with people who grew up on farms. I would visit their homes and fall in love with the lifestyle and leave wanting to know more about why they lived that way and how I could someday be a part of it.

Why grass fed?

I genuinely believe in being aware of the what the animals you eat are eating. I have seen what grass-fed and finished looks like especially in the open lands where forage is a mix of wild grasses and flowers. What that animal eats comes through in the meat. Meat has terroir too.

Why do you think it is important for people to eat food that is produced locally?

When we eat locally we support the people in our communities that have committed their life to providing for others. We reduce the distance that food has to travel to get to market. We are able to understand better how and why that food is grown and make more educated choices. We are then consuming more sustainably.

What are some of the obstacles for a woman in the ranching world?

Having your own identity. Not being someone’s wife or daughter but your own woman who paved her own way.

Finding workwear made to fit a woman.

Which Red Wing boots are you sporting?

Black Engineer

RedWing3354

 

 

 

 

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